01 March 2014

rehefitness newsletter January 2014

Fit Fact

Injured?

Don't let that injury stop you

Being injured is no fun. That is especially true if you have been having success along your fitness journey; an injury can seem like just the thing to push you backwards, eliminating all your progress. Fortunately you don't have to face that challenge alone.

As a fitness professional it's my responsibility to work with people of all ability levels and injury status. For my personal training clients I have a strict assessment and exercise planning protocol that I must follow to ensure safe and effective workouts. All fitness professionals are charged with this very same whole-body approach to musculoskeletal fitness.

If you decide that the guidance of a fitness professional isn't quite right for you, here are a few tips on how to exercise while injured:

  • Keep yourself safe. A broken wrist will not prevent you from doing some leg exercise but you won't be able to safely do many exercise that involve you using your hands to grip or hold on to things.
  • Determine what you can do. Speak with your health care provider and find out what is off limits. In today's age there are so many options for exercise that there is bound to be something that you can do.
  • Try something new. So maybe because of your sprained ankle you can't do that step aerobics class you love so much but what about yoga? Step out of the box and safely experiment with a new fitness challenge.

The important thing to keep in mind is that unless you are prescribed bed rest there is probably some form of physical activity that you can benefit from. Be creative, and with safety in mind find what works for you and your specific situation. If you're feeling up to it join me for some great fitness opportunities!

Nutrition Nugget

The Healthy Eating Plate

Healthy shopping at the supermarket

What I'm about to share with you is nothing new. The quality of food that you consume is important.

I defer to experts in the field of human nutrition, The Nutrition Source from the Harvard School of Public Health has an excellent resource called the Healthy Eating Plate. Here is some more information:

  • The type of carbohydrate in the diet is more important than the amount of carbohydrate in the diet, because some sources of carbohydrate—like vegetables (other than potatoes), fruits, whole grains, and beans—are healthier than others.
  • The Healthy Eating Plate also advises consumers to avoid sugary beverages, a major source of calories—usually with little nutritional value—in the American diet.
  • The Healthy Eating Plate encourages consumers to use healthy oils, and it does not set a maximum on the percentage of calories people should get each day from healthy sources of fat. In this way, the Healthy Eating Plate recommends the opposite of the low-fat message promoted for decades by the USDA.
  • The Healthy Eating Plate summarizes the best evidence-based dietary information available today.

In summary, using The Health Eating Plate as a guideline, set two to three healthy shopping goals for yourself each time you plan on going to the grocery store. It could be as easy as:

  • buy one red fruit (like strawberries)
  • buy one leafy green vegetable (like kale)
  • buy one whole grain (like steel cut oatmeal)
Following through with basic goals such as these will boost your confidence so that you'll be a healthy food shopping master in a matter of weeks. Good luck - I believe in you!

 

The Healthy Eating Plate is Copyright © 2011, Harvard University. For more information about The Healthy Eating Plate, please see The Nutrition Source, Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, www.thenutritionsource.org, and Harvard Health Publications, www.health.harvard.edu.

Closing

Thanks for making this a part of your day. Have you got questions that you'd like answered? Have you got questions about personal fitness and nutrition that you'd like answered? I might be able to answer them here in future issues of this exclusive email newsletter. Send me an email and I'd be happy to answer your questions!

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